I. Zulyak, A. Klish SOCIAL AND POLITICAL ORIENTATION OF THE ROME-CATHOLIC HIGHER CLERGY IN GALICIA IN THE EARLY 1900’s

DOI: 10.20535/2307-5244.52.2021.236155

Ternopil Volodymyr Hnatiuk National Pedagogical University

The article examines the socio-political orientations of the higher Roman
Catholic clergy in Galicia in the early twentieth century. It was found that at the
appointed time there were significant social upheavals: the suppression of workers’
demonstrations in Lviv, the peasant strikes of 1902, etc. The church could
not stay away from those events. In the article, we analyzed the idea of the establishment
of a Catholic organization by representatives of the clergy and secular
intelligentsia, which would strengthen the role of the Roman Catholic Church in
society. In our study, we proved that the Church, on the one hand, tried to solve
urgent social issues, on the other hand, to oppose Christian democracy to social
democracy.
The newly established organization, the Catholic-Social Union (CSU), was
apolitical and aimed to unite all parts of society in order to solve religious, social,
economic, and educational problems. The CSU played an important role in the establishment
of the Polish social and Christian movement in Galicia, especially in
the Diocese of Przemyśl. Instead, the Catholic clergy tried to support the Poles in
Galicia. In our article, we assessed the socio-political orientation of the higher Roman
Catholic clergy in Galicia in the early 20th century. The principles of Christian
democracy differed from the views of moderate democrats, as they recognized the
supremacy of the lower strata of the population over the higher ones. The main
tasks of the CSU were to strengthen Catholic principles in public, family, and personal
life, as well as in the education of young people, improving social relations
in the spirit of Christian justice, protection of national rights and interests.

Keywords: Galicia, Roman Catholic Church, higher clergy, Christian democracy,
social-christian movement.

52_07_Zulyak.pdf

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